RCC Membership Renewal

Man Writing Document Dinning Table Concept

I love the season we’re in as a church.  As I shared in the sermon this past Sunday, we’re asking all of our members to enter into a really simple but really significant membership renewal process over the next few weeks.

When I say simple, I mean all we’re asking you to do is let us know you want to continue as a member, update your contact information, reaffirm the commitments you made when you became a member and let us know if you have any questions or concerns you would like to discuss with our staff or elders.  That’s it.  The whole thing will take you less than five minutes to do online; just click here.

Let me also tell you why I think it’s significant:

  1. Ensures Our Membership Rolls Are Accurate.  As our church continues to grow and we add more members, communicating well within the church requires more and more intentionality.  It’s honestly one of the bigger challenges we have, so it’s not a small thing for us to make sure we have an accurate phone number, email address and mailing address for you.  We also want to make sure we’re updating our membership records to reflect people who have moved out of the area or started attending another church.  We don’t want to be the church that proudly reports 2,000 members but has less than 100 people showing up on a Sunday morning!  Membership renewal helps us avoid that trap.  We want to have an accurate sense of who’s really with us as a church.
  2. Reminds Us That Membership Matters.  I meet a lot of Christians today who dismiss church membership as an unhelpful relic of the past.  Maybe that’s true if you look at membership as a formal promise that you won’t even think about attending another church, even if ours is really bad and a really awesome one moves in right down the road.  Church membership isn’t about trapping you.  It’s about discipling you within a local church.
  3. Prompts Reflection On The Commitments We’ve Made To Each Other.  This is what church membership is really about – the commitments we’ve made to one another.  For us at Restoration City, our members make 9 commitments to one another; they’re the commitments that create our culture, define expectations and keep us healthy as a spiritual family.  More than anything, my prayer for this membership renewal process is that it will be a catalyst for self reflection.  It’s a chance to step back and ask ourselves how much those commitments are shaping our lives, make any needed course corrections and move forward as a unified body.  It’s about resyncing us with what we’ve already committed.
  4. Creates An Additional Touchpoint For Pastoral Care.  No, I don’t think a web form is pastoral care.  But I do think it can become a prompt for it.  Please, use the comments and prayer requests sections of the form.  Our staff and elders would be honored to pray for you and we want to hear from you.  If you have questions, concerns or suggestions about the church, let us know.  We want your input and would be happy to talk more in person or over the phone.

So, if you haven’t done so already, please complete your renewal process today.

If you’re not yet a member of Restoration City but would like to become one, please plan to join us for our next New Members Class on Sunday, June 4th right after church.  You can get more information and sign up here.

I’m really grateful for all God is doing in this season to strengthen and unify us as a church.

Measuring Success

Pastors and churches have a strange relationship with numbers.  By that, I don’t mean math in general (although I would personally plead guilty to that!) but the idea of measuring things in the church.  What business people call metrics, pastors call numbers.  And we have no idea how to feel about them.  Sometimes it’s just downright painful to listen to pastors work their way through a tortured and insincere rendition of the old “obviously, numbers aren’t everything” cliche.  We all know that if the same pastor heard the offering just doubled, he would get a little more comfortable with numbers!  It’s a strange tension – living and dying by Sunday’s attendance is a crushing form of idolatry but totally ignoring numbers is irresponsible leadership.

In planting Restoration City, we decided to navigate the tension by making an unapologetically big deal of numbers.  We measure things.  For example, I know how many people have been to each service, what our offering is, how many kids go to RCCKids, how many people serve those kids and a bunch of other things.  Without good information, we can’t make good decisions.

But here’s the key for us at Restoration City when it comes to numbers: What we celebrate matters more than what we measure.  So much of the awkwardness around the numbers conversation doesn’t come from the fact that we measure things, it comes from the fact that we celebrate the wrong things.  If all a church ever celebrates is it’s attendance and offering, the congregation will get the message – what the leadership really cares about is butts in seats and dollars in offering plates.  Celebration is a powerful communicator of culture and values.

For us at Restoration City, there are three numbers we celebrate: baptisms, community group participation and membership.  We measure a lot of things but celebrate those because we think they are the three most important indicators of our success as a church.  In other words, if those numbers are healthy and moving in the right direction, everything else should fall in place.

Here’s why we picked those three numbers:

  • Baptism is the best way for us to measure life change through salvation and the beginning of a discipleship process.  Counting decisions for Christ is inexact and often inflated.  Baptism is a far more reliable and helpful number for us.
  • Community Group attendance is the best way for us to measure a person’s commitment to Restoration City.  When someone takes the step of joining a Community Group, they are more or less committed to us as a church.  They’re moving through our discipleship process and developing the relationships that will make RCC a spiritual home.
  • Membership is the best way for us to measure that a person is fully participating in the life of the church.  All of our members agree to a fairly specific membership covenant.  When someone is willing to make all of those commitments, we know they are fully engaged in the mission and culture of Restoration City.

When we look at our first weeks as a church, we realize just how much we have to celebrate.

  • We have baptized 9 people since this summer.
  • We currently have 80 people in Community Groups.
  • We have 41 active members.

When we remember those numbers come from God’s grace, not our merit, our celebration turns into worship, praise and gratitude.  As we enter into a week of thanksgiving, I hope you will join me in thanking God for all He has done through Restoration City.